Flutterings (from VexTab #52)

from Vexilloid Tabloid #52

Note: “Flutterings” — notes from the editor on our last meeting — is a regular feature in The Vexilloid Tabloid.

May Flutterings You Need to Know

In our May meeting, hosted by John Schilke, 18 PFA members and guests enjoyed a lively 3-hour evening of flags and other wide-ranging topics.  As the host, John led the introductions and moderated the discussion.

Scott Mainwaring gave an update on the Oregon Flag Registry, especially thanking Elmer’s for sharing information on hundreds of flags.  He commended Michael Orelove on the complete entry for the city of Gresham.  He introduced a challenge of “people on state flags”, and shared David Dunnico’s A White Flag on the Moon.

Ken Dale reflected on the bicentennial of the end of the War of 1812 and on its causes.

David Anchel described how the equality flag (yellow equals sign on blue) was designed in Portland and how Elmer’s makes it in-house.

David Anchel leads an intriguing discussion of the high design quality of the flags of Caribbean states and the possible reasons for their success.
David Anchel leads an intriguing discussion of the high design quality of the flags of Caribbean states and the possible reasons for their success.

Dennis Stevens is pleased that his changed work schedule will  allow him to attend our meetings.

Dennis Stevens celebrates his native California with a gift from Patrick Genna.
Dennis Stevens celebrates his native California with a gift from Patrick Genna.

David Ferriday shared some of his recent flag-related acquisitions, including a beer stein, shot glass, and key ring.  He shared images of the Scandinavian flags at the Nordic Cultural Center on Oleson Road and some images from     design books.

Flags in Spokane's Cathedral of St. John, photo from www.inlander.com
Flags in Spokane’s Cathedral of St. John, photo from www.inlander.com

Larry Snyder showed an image of Spokane, Washington’s Cathedral of St. John, its interior festooned with the banners of every church in the diocese.

Larry Snyder shows off his Union Jack reading glasses.
Larry Snyder shows off his Union Jack reading glasses.

David Koski asked:  “How long does an outdoor flag usually last?”.  He got full answers from David Anchel (6 months to a year) and Mike Hale (who went on to explain his invention of “feather flags”).  They reported a rule of thumb common to flag dealers but new to us:  replace a U.S. flag when the stripes are shorter than the canton.

Mike Hale played “name that flag” with a souvenir bought during his May 2014 visit to Bruges, Belgium.

Mike Hale enjoyed the broad flag-flying he’d seen in Bruges.
Mike Hale enjoyed the broad flag-flying he’d seen in Bruges.

In response to his letters soliciting flags for educational purposes,  Michael Orelove continues to receive them from nations, cities, and government agencies.  The latest include Senegal; Springfield, Illinois; and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (which warned him to use the flag only for non-profit purposes!).

David Koski admires the Senegalese flag displayed by Michael Orelove.
David Koski admires the Senegalese flag displayed by Michael Orelove.

Max Liberman took careful notes; Jessie Spillers enjoyed the flags.

Patrick Genna reveled in giving out over a dozen flags of all sizes he’d gleaned at Goodwill. One inscribed “Cherokee Braves” at first seemed to him the flag of a sports team; he then learned of the Confederate troops raised from native tribes.

At first Patrick Genna thought this flag might represent a sports team!
At first Patrick Genna thought this flag might represent a sports team!

Visitor Casey Sims brought his Portland Ska Flag (see VT #51) and described the process of its creation by a bandmate as well as his own interest in flags.

sims-omsec-flag
Casey Sims shares the Portland-Jamaica fusion flag used by his band, the Original Middleage Ska Enjoy Club.

Keryn Anchel may commemorate the now-famous carpet from the Portland International Airport with a flag using its motif.

Karen Anchel wants to produce a flag based on the (old) PDX carpet.
Karen Anchel wants to produce a flag based on the (old) PDX carpet.

With Fiji’s new flag effort under way, Ted Kaye disclosed that in two days he would travel there to serve as technical advisor to the national flag committee.

Our special guest, Alexander Baretich, described how he’d designed the Cascadia flag in 1995 (see VT #36).  Robert Izatt, his student, helped him display a huge version.  He discussed his decision to put the design into “creative commons” for all to share.

baretich-cascadia
Alexander Baretich, designer of the Cascadia flag, describes its origin.

Our next meeting will be at the home of Ted Kaye on July 9th.   He took the Portland Flag Association flag with him—the customary task of the next host.

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Author: SDM

Ethnography * Technology * Design

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