Arboreal Flags

A popular flag in Portland is the “Doug Flag” of Cascadia, a favorite of the Timbers Army and secessionist Pacific Northwesterners.

The flag of the bioregion of Cascadia, designed by Alexander Baretich, 1994-1995. Also known as the Doug Flag, it depicts a Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Source: Wikipedia.
The flag of the bioregion of Cascadia, designed by Alexander Baretich, 1994-1995. Also known as the Doug Flag, it depicts a Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii).
Source: Wikipedia.

Let’s look at some of its neighbors – tree flags of the world.

Lebanon Cedar

The Lebanese national flag, hand-drawn and signed by deputies of the Lebanese parliament. Source: www.clevelandpeople.com/groups/lebanese/lebanese.htm
The Lebanese national flag, hand-drawn and signed by deputies of the Lebanese parliament, 11 November 1943.  The tree is a Lebanon Cedar(Cedrus libani). Source: www.clevelandpeople.com/groups/lebanese/lebanese.htm

Norfolk Island Pine

The flag of the Australian territory of Norfolk Island, adopted in 1980. The tree is, appropriately enough, a Norfolk Island Pine (Araucaria heterophylla), endemic to the island.
The flag of the Australian territory of Norfolk Island, adopted in 1980. The tree is a Norfolk Island Pine (Araucaria heterophylla), endemic to the island. (Source: Wikipedia)

Fir

Town flag of Borjomi, Georgia. Source: Wikipedia.
Town flag of Borjomi, Georgia, adopted 2009.  The trees are firs. Source: Wikipedia and FOTW.

Oak

Flag of the Canadian province of Prince Edward Island, adopted 1964. The trees are oaks, the big one on the right representing England, the three saplings on the left the three counties comprising PEI. Source: Wikipedia and FOTW.
Flag of the Canadian province of Prince Edward Island, adopted 1964. The trees are oaks, the big one on the right representing England, the three saplings on the left the three counties comprising PEI. Source: Wikipedia and FOTW.
Town flag of Martvili, Georgia, adopted 2011. Source: FOTW and www.martvili-sakrebulo.ge.
Town flag of Martvili, Georgia, adopted 2011. The tree, an oak, refers to a large oak used for pagan celebrations that St. Andrew is said to have convinced the locals to cut down.  Source: FOTW and www.martvili-sakrebulo.ge.
Flag of the Nottinghamshire County Council, England. Source: British County Flags and Wikimedia Commons.
Flag of the Nottinghamshire County Council, England. Source: British County Flags and Wikimedia Commons.
City flag of Oakland, California, designed by George Laakso of San Leandro in 1952. Source: FOTW.
City flag of Oakland, California, designed by George Laakso of San Leandro in 1952. Source: FOTW and Wikimedia Commons.
Flag of Gernika-Lumo, Basque Country, Spain. Source: Wikimedia Commons.
Flag of Gernika-Lumo, Basque Country, Spain. The tree is an oak called the Gernikako Arbola, site and symbol of Basque self-government. Source: Wikimedia Commons and Wikipedia.

Magnolia

Flag of the Confederate state of Mississippi, captured by the 2nd Iowa Cavalry on 30 May 1862, now at the State Historical Society of Iowa. The tree is a Southern Magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora). Source: Historical Flags article
Flag of the Confederate state of Mississippi, captured by the 2nd Iowa Cavalry on 30 May 1862, now at the State Historical Society of Iowa. The tree is a Southern Magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora). Source: Historical Flags article “Mississippi’s Magnolia Flags” by Clay Moss.

Palmetto

Flag of South Carolina. The tree is a Carolina Palmetto (Sabal palmetto). Source: Wikipedia.
Flag of South Carolina. The tree is a Carolina Palmetto (Sabal palmetto), and refers to the palmetto logs used to construct the fort on Sullivan’s Island that survived British bombardment on 28 June 1776. Source: Wikipedia and home.freeuk.net/gazkhan/blank_state.htm

White Pine

Flag of New England, ca 1775 (as it appears in Jonathan Trumbell's painting of 1785,
Flag of New England, 1775 (modern rendition). The tree is a White Pine (Pinus strobus). See “The New England Flag” by David B. Martucci. Image source: Wikipedia.  This flag has been adopted unofficially by fans of the MLS New England Revolution team, and officially as the flag of Lincoln County, Maine (1977).
The Pine Tree Flag of the American Revolution, 1775. Same tree as on the contemporaneous New England Flag. Source: Wikipedia.
The Pine Tree Flag of the American Revolution, 1775. Same tree as on the contemporaneous New England Flag. Source: Wikipedia.
The Lone Pine Flag of Dartmouth University. (Flag is flying at half-staff in memory of Dartmouth alum and US Surgeon General C. Everett Koop.) Source: thenaturalistsnotebook.com/science-music-and-fun-at-dartmouth
The Lone Pine Flag of Dartmouth University, designed by John Scotford for Dartmouth’s 1969 bicentennial.  It depicts a particular White Pine that used to stand on campus.  (In this photo the flag is flying at half-staff in memory of Dartmouth alum and US Surgeon General C. Everett Koop.) Source: thenaturalistsnotebook.com/science-music-and-fun-at-dartmouth

Mythological

Flag of the Kings of Gondor (from Tolkein's mythos). Source: Wikimedia Commons.
Flag of the Kings of Gondor (from Tolkein’s mythos). The tree is the White Tree of Gondor. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Unknown

Municipal flag of Pastvini, Czech Republic. Source: Wikimedia Commons and FOTW.
Municipal flag of Pastvini, Czech Republic. Source: Wikimedia Commons and FOTW.
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Author: SDM

Ethnography * Technology * Design

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