Logo Flags

The 4th basic principle of flag design is “no lettering or seals”.  Logos generally fall under this category as well.  This doesn’t keep lots of flags, particularly of corporations, from having logos on them.  And occasionally a logo flag works well as a flag — usually because it obeys all or most of the other four principles (keep it simple, use meaningful symbolism, use 2 or 3 basic colors, and be distinctive or be related).

The McDonald’s logo, the Golden Arches, is one that works well on a flag: it is simple, bold, distinctive, and the stylized M is readable from the front or back.

Harvard's H also works well for the same reasons as McDonald's (though it is far less distinctive).  Letters A, H, I, M, O, T, U, V, and W all exhibit vertical-axis symmetry.
Harvard’s H also works well for the same reasons as McDonald’s (though it is far less distinctive). Letters A, H, I, M, O, T, U, V, and W all exhibit vertical-axis symmetry.  (Photo by panoramio user karenjill.)
All of Japan's prefectures use what are essentially logos for their flags (and as a result can be mistaken for corporate flags).  This is Fukuoka's, a stylized  ふく (fuku) that also symbolizes a plum flower.
All of Japan’s prefectures use what are essentially logos (mon) for their flags (and as a result risk being mistaken for corporate flags). This is Fukuoka’s, a stylized ふく (fuku) that also symbolizes a plum flower.
Spanish flag with the Osborne bull.  Originally the logo of the Veteran brand of Jerez brandy produced by the Osborne Group.
Spanish flag with the Osborne bull. Originally the logo of the Veteran brand of Jerez brandy produced by the Osborne Group, large cutouts of the silhouette bull have been used as roadside advertising, eventually becoming popular and officially recognized.
Hotmail flag.  A flag with all the Hotmail logos from the last 10 years flies one last time. Photo by Nial Kennedy, taken 14 July 2006, posted on Flickr.
Here is a flag with many logos: all the different Microsoft Hotmail logos that were used from 1997-2006. Photo by Nial Kennedy, taken 14 July 2006, posted on Flickr.
One of Adbusters' American Corporate Flag designs.  These use culture jamming to express dissent.  Unlike the Hotmail flag, the multiple logos here work effectively as they, as a group, meaningfully replace the stars of the Stars and Stripes.
One of Adbusters’ American Corporate Flag designs. These use culture jamming to express dissent. Unlike the Hotmail flag, the multiple logos here work effectively as they, as a group, meaningfully replace the stars of the Stars and Stripes.
Advertisements

Author: SDM

Ethnography * Technology * Design

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s