Your Flag (Is Wack)

Heath Cottengim has created this epic vexillological rap video.  Enjoy.

 

[Hook: Heath Cottengim]
Your flag is wack, your flag is wack, your flag is wack
Belgium just Germany taking a nap
I’d take it all back
If you’d just change the flag
I be on the attack
‘Cause your flag is wack

[Verse 1: Heath Cottengim]
Indonesia and Monaco, one of you has gotta go
How’s the public supposed to know
Who’s who when that shits on the pole
You’re no better Poland, looking
Upside-down like Spiderman
Next time hire a designer
So your flag don’t look so stolen
You may think I’m mad, you may think I’m absurd
But it ain’t my fault Netherlands looks like Luxembourg
So many bad flags I can’t tell them apart
Which one of these is Ireland and
Which one’s Cote d’Ivoire?
I be in the stadium
Watchin’ the game
Chad and Romania
Look exactly the same
You’d be none the wiser
If I asked you to squint
It’s like the designer
Threw out the blueprint
Not tryna to make enemies
Half the Middle East looks Yemeni
Throwing flags out like a referee
Don’t care if it’s a felony
Extortion, genocide, organ shortages, yellow fever
Are not why I take the time to call up every foreign leader
(telephone rings)
Hello, you’ve reached Prime Minister of Australia
Hey Malcolm, how come you still stealin’ from New Zealand?
I mean it. I’ll break these Union Jack’s backs
Like the Bane of flags
I’m not insane, I’m just statin’ the facts
Let’s bring it back for you amnesiacs

[Hook: Heath Cottengim]

Your flag is wack, your flag is wack, your flag is wack
Norway is okay if you can do math (do math)
If you can’t take the flak
Take it off the map
It’s as simple as that
‘Cause your flag is wack
Your flag is wack, your flag is wack, your flag is wack
Greenland pretends to not be an app
Don’t tell me to relax
I’ll watch your country collapse
Nepal gets a pass
But your flag is wack

[Verse 2: Heath Cottengim]
I want flags different, distinct and unique
Think Canada, Panama, Zanzibar and Mozambique, ayy
Wait, Mozambique has an AK?
They’re not so scary, their military’s
Smaller than Notre Dame
Although I enjoy this, let me be open
When bad shit gets hoisted, people get disappointed
Point is this message is essential, so don’t try to avoid it
‘Cause I’ll just keep roasting the globe
’till I hit the ocean (Let’s go!)
Seychelles, looking like I’m about to get my groove on
Qatar, looking like I’m bout to tear a coupon
Kyrgyzstan’s’ll work, but you gotta turn it on first
Look at Antwerp’s too long and it starts to hurt
Don’t expect apology, won’t accept low quality
Just next time respect vexillology
Try to find the strength to face the fact that
Maybe the flag needs to tend the rabbits
I’m probably preaching to the choir
But when it comes to flags I think we can
Raise the bar a little higher
To those who’d fight a redesigner
I’ll leave you looking like the guy in the Benin Empire

[Hook: Heath Cottengim]
Your flag is wack, your flag is wack, your flag is wack
Rather be Martian than live under that
Some flags have class
Others are crap
I’d start from scratch
‘Cause your flag is wack
Your flag is wack, your flag is wack, your flag is wack
Pocatello, what am I lookin’ at?
It shouldn’t have taken a rap
To convince you that
When it comes to flags
Your flag is wack

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Our Most Popular Posts of 2015

Here are our 20 most-viewed* blog posts of the year.


#20 – Andy Warhol and the American Flag (226 views)

Andy Warhol, 1983 - by Alberto Schommer
Andy Warhol, 1983 – by Alberto Schommer

#19 – Fargo — A Flag for the Flagless? (247 views)

WEB_FargoFlag_Crtsy-The-Arts-Partnership
The most popular submission is this remarkably simple but unconventional design.

#18 – Heart Flags (257 views)

Tim Van Horn took 2010 portraits of Canadians between 10/08 and 1/10, and created this Canadian Heart Flag mosaic.
Tim Van Horn took 2010 portraits of Canadians between 10/08 and 1/10, and created this Canadian Heart Flag mosaic.

#17 – American Flag Refreshed for 2015 (303 views)

Flag of the United States of America, as of 1 April 2015.
Flag of the United States of America, as of 1 April 2015.

#16 – The Flag of HDYNATION (307 views)

A Flosstradamusified Chicago flag.
A Flosstradamusified Chicago flag.

#15 – Outkast’s Stankonia flag (330 views)

Cover of the album Stankonia.
Cover of the album Stankonia.

#14 – Letter Society Project 25: City Flag (338)

"For Project 25, we are going to be (re)designing a city flag. It doesn’t matter which city. Just pick one and make a beautiful flag for it :)" June 2015 design challenge by @LetterSociety
“For Project 25, we are going to be (re)designing a city flag. It doesn’t matter which city. Just pick one and make a beautiful flag for it :)” June 2015 design challenge by @LetterSociety

#13 – US City Flag Improvement Efforts (353 views)

Grand Rapids, Michigan
Current flag of Grand Rapids, Michigan

#12 – Improving Boston’s City Flag (381 views)

Boston, Massachusetts
Flag of Boston, Massachusetts.

#10 – Historical Flags (385 views)

loeser
Pete Loeser’s website Historical Flags of Our Ancestors has grown over time into a wonderful resource for vexillologists and flag enthusiasts.

#10 – Provo Puts Its Latest Logo on a Bedsheet (385 views)

Flag of Provo as of January 6, 2015. Designed by Stephen Hales.
Flag of Provo as of January 6, 2015. Designed by Stephen Hales.

#9 – Designs Sought for New Milwaukee Flag (414 views)

The city flag of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, designed by former alderman Fred Steffan in 1955 based on submissions to a design contest.
The city flag of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, designed by former alderman Fred Steffan in 1955 based on submissions to a design contest.

#8 – The Vexillogicast (427 views)

Simon the Cannibal
Simon the Cannibal

#7 – Mexican-American Flags (495 views)

IMG_6722
Mexican-American Flag, by Nacho Becerra. Tapestry with silkscreened stars and altered sarape.

#6 – SF Flag Redesigns (563 views)

Rachel Berger's proposal symbolizes changing fortunes: "the story of [SF] has never been flat". It can be hung with the arrow ascending, or descending, depending on the flyer's mood.
Rachel Berger’s proposal symbolizes changing fortunes: “the story of [SF] has never been flat”. It can be hung with the arrow ascending, or descending, depending on the flyer’s mood.

#5 – Machine Gun Kelly: Raise the Flag (595 views)

mgk-raisetheflag-still2
From the music video: a black and white version of the US/EST 19XX flag, sewn together with a standard US flag.

#4 – Andy Warhol, NASA, and the Making of “Moonwalk” (1,248 views)

Detail of the original raw image, showing Armstrong reflected in Aldrin's visor.
Detail of the original raw image, showing Armstrong reflected in Aldrin’s visor.

#3 – Hip Hop and the Confederate Flag (1,401 views)

Image on Yeezus 2013 merchandise. From "Kanye West Is Trying To Take The Confederate Flag Back" by Sharmin Kent on thinkprogress.com.
Image on Yeezus 2013 merchandise. From “Kanye West Is Trying To Take The Confederate Flag Back” by Sharmin Kent on thinkprogress.com.

#2 – What If There Were No Third Flag Act? (1,715 views)

Michael Orelove and his 50-star, 50-stripe US flag.
Michael Orelove and his 50-star, 50-stripe US flag.

#1 – 23 Finalists for New Fiji Flag (32,833 views)

Flag_of_Fiji.svg
The current Fijian flag

* as of 28 December 2015, excluding the number of times a post was viewed via our homepage, portlandflag.org.

The Flag of HDYNATION

HDYNATION flag. Photo by @rukes.
HDYNATION flag. Photo by @rukes.

Flosstradamus is a highly vexilliferous Trap music duo from Chicago with followers who deem themselves HDYNATION (Hoodie Nation, after the DJs’ 2011 decision to rebrand their look by wearing black hoodies and sweatpants).  The HDYNATION flag is a black-and-white version of the US flag with the stars replaced by a “general warning” sign comprising an exclamation point within a triangle.  Why the warning sign? Ani Hajderaj explains in a posting on Vice’s thump site:

The #HDYNATION tour is particularly special because renowned designer Virgil Abloh became involved with their set design. Abloh is well known for his design work on Kanye West’s label Good Music and also his art for the Yeezus tour. […] The set design includes a burned down car with functional headlights, fluorescent tube lighting and a massive DJ booth that’s decorated with the warning sign and barbed wire―really giving it that post-apocalyptic aesthetic.

The warning sign in their set has become a widely recognized symbol within the trap scene. But it’s there for a reason―it’s a throwback to the old hardcore and house records that Autobot listened to. “A lot of hardcore and hard house used to have street signs on them. The warning sign made the cut for one of Fool’s Gold releases and then [we] stuck with it during the second volume. But that time [we made it] in 3D. Our fans kept tweeting at us with warning signs, so we took it as our new logo,” he said.

"@FLOSSTRADAMUS and @WakaFlockabsm  link up for “TTU (Too Turnt Up)”."  Photo from Nick Guarino's @thissongisNICK feed.
“@FLOSSTRADAMUS and @WakaFlockabsm link up for “TTU (Too Turnt Up)”.” Photo from Nick Guarino @thissongisNICK.
A fan-made flag.  Photo from @MostDopeMII's feed.
A fan-made flag. From @MostDopeMII.
Reenacting the Iwo Jima flag raising, in Cleveland.  From the @FLOSSTRADAMUS feed.
Reenacting the Iwo Jima flag raising, in Cleveland. From @FLOSSTRADAMUS.
A Flosstradamusified Chicago flag.
A Flosstradamusified Chicago flag. “WE MAY NOT HAVE PUT CHICAGO ON THE MAP, BUT WE’RE MAKING SURE IT STAYS THERE”.  From @FLOSSTRADAMUS.
A Chicago fan shows commitment.  From Bryce Parker @BryceParker.
A Chicago fan shows commitment. From Bryce Parker @BryceParker.

The US Flag in the 21st Century

31 October 2000

The Stankonia flag, by OutKast.
The Stankonia flag, by Outkast.

American hip hop duo Outkast release their fouth studio album, Stankonia.  The iconic album cover consists of Big Boi and André 3000 posing in front of a huge, black-and-white US flag with inverted stars: the funkified flag of Stankonia (which actually was manufactured and hung on the wall in their Atlanta studios).  (For more, see our blog posting Outkast’s Stankonia flag.)


11 September 2001

My daughter, who goes to Stuyvesant High School only blocks from the World Trade Center, thinks we should fly an American flag out our window. Definitely not, I say: The flag stands for jingoism and vengeance and war. She tells me I’m wrong–the flag means standing together and honoring the dead and saying no to terrorism. In a way we’re both right: The Stars and Stripes is the only available symbol right now. In New York City, it decorates taxicabs driven by Indians and Pakistanis, the impromptu memorials of candles and flowers that have sprung up in front of every firehouse, the chi-chi art galleries and boutiques of SoHo. It has to bear a wide range of meanings, from simple, dignified sorrow to the violent anti-Arab and anti-Muslim bigotry that has already resulted in murder, vandalism and arson around the country and harassment on New York City streets and campuses. It seems impossible to explain to a 13-year-old, for whom the war in Vietnam might as well be the War of Jenkins’s Ear, the connection between waving the flag and bombing ordinary people half a world away back to the proverbial stone age. I tell her she can buy a flag with her own money and fly it out her bedroom window, because that’s hers, but the living room is off-limits.  (The opening of Put Out No Flags by Katha Pollitt.)

Following the shock of the 9/11 terrorist attacks the popularity of the flag surges and social pressure to display it builds.  Feminist critic Katha Pollitt captures the moment in her controversial essay “Put Out No Flags” published in The Nation a month following the attacks.


31 May 2002

The so-called First Navy Jack.  Flag scholar Peter Ansoff has demonstrated that it "was a 19th-century mistake based on an erroneous 1776 engraving".
The so-called First Navy Jack. Flag scholar Peter Ansoff has demonstrated that it “was a 19th-century mistake based on an erroneous 1776 engraving”.

The Navy directs its ships to substitute the so-called First Navy Jack for the US jack  “during the Global War on Terrorism“.  As of today, still no end in sight.


4 July 2007

Nukolz the dog received more press attention on 7/4/07 than the 50-star flag's surpassing any other version.  (Nukolz placed 2nd in the patriotism category in the annual Yankee Doodle Doggie Show in Anaheim Hills, CA.)
Nukolz the dog received more press attention on 7/4/07 than the 50-star flag’s surpassing any other version. (Nukolz placed 2nd in the patriotism category in the annual Yankee Doodle Doggie Show in Anaheim Hills, CA.)

Current 50-star flag surpasses the 48-star flag as the longest-used version of the flag.  No one notices.


4 July 2010

Golden Jubilee Flag, designed by Ed Mooney.
Golden Jubilee Flag, designed by Ed Mooney.  Peter Orenski created, manufactured, and sold his own version, in which 26 gold stars form the number 50 within a rectangular border of 24 white stars.

Current 50-star flag celebrates its Golden Jubilee 50th anniversary.  Again, no one notices, but vexillologist  Peter Orenski notices that no one notices in his paper Unpledged Allegiance: Golden Jubilee of the 50-Star flag.  From the abstract: This anniversary was greeted with a colossal yawn not only by a great majority of ordinary Americans, but also by most flag enthusiasts, flag manufacturers, patriotic organizations, schools, veterans groups, government agencies and news media. Question: Why did a country so conscious about its flag allow this anniversary to pass practically unobserved? This paper presents a range of possible answers, some based on historical perspectives, others on interviews with news outlets, veterans, school teachers, flag-involved individuals and organizations.


22 July 2014

One of two enormous, custom-made, all-white US flags flying above the Brooklyn Bridge.
One of two enormous, custom-made, all-white US flags flying above the Brooklyn Bridge.

Sometime after midnight German artists Matthias Wermke and Mischa Leinkauf evade police surveillance to replace each 10-by-19-foot U.S. flag atop both towers of the Brooklyn Bridge with all-white versions of their own making.  Though seriously freaking out the guardians of the bridge tasked with protecting it from terrorism, it turned out to be an extension of the artists’ “interventions and performances” in urban public space, “to question common standards and show the beauty beyond these standards”.  In their Brooklyn Bridge project, Wermke and Leinkauf manage to defamiliarize the US flag and make us wonder at its continuing power.  (See our blog posting, White Flags, for more on de-coloring the US flag as an artistic tactic.)

Hip Hop and the Confederate Flag

An oft-republished image of Kanye West wearing the Confederate flag on his sleeve.
An oft-republished image of Kanye West wearing the Confederate flag on his sleeve. Photo by X17.com on Saturday, November 2, 2013.

No survey of flags in hip hop would be complete without acknowledging the controversial use by rappers, from time to time, of the Confederate flag.  Two years ago this topic gained a great deal of attention when Kanye West put the flag on his clothing and merchandise while touring to promote his 2013 album Yeezus.  He was widely quoted saying:

“React how you want. Like I said, any energy you got is good energy. You know, the Confederate flag represented slavery, in a way — that’s my abstract take on what I know about it, right? So I made the song ‘New Slaves.’ So I took the Confederate flag and made it my flag. It’s my flag now! Now what are you gonna do?”

Image on Yeezus 2013 merchandise.  From
Image on Yeezus 2013 merchandise. From “Kanye West Is Trying To Take The Confederate Flag Back” by Sharmin Kent on thinkprogress.com.

He was strongly criticized by some black leaders and entertainers, notably Al Sharpton, for using a hated symbol of oppression as part of a publicity stunt to promote himself and his album.  They urged consumers to boycott the album and merchandise — ineffectively, as over one million records were shipped by the end of the year.  Others supported the bold move.   In Uptown magazine Lincoln Anthony Blades wrote:

For Kanye, wearing the Confederate flag isn’t about mocking his ancestors, but appropriating something that white, conservative racists love, and letting them feel helpless as he denigrates everything it means to them.

This unimpeachable symbol of white power is now nothing more than a fashion statement that Kanye wants to OWN and minimize, just like Black culture and history is appropriated by whites everyday.

By now this tempest has mostly died away, but not entirely.  A 2014 video by Ethiopian Canadian performer Abel Tesfaye, known as The Weeknd, raised some eyebrows for showing, briefly, a Confederate flag as room decor:

Produced by Toronto design and film studio “Kid.”  Uploaded to YouTube Aug 28, 2014, it has currently reached over 8.7 million views.

The lights are down, but a Confederate flag is on the wall.
The lights are down, but a Confederate flag can be seen in the background, behind dancing Canadians.

Ally Schweitzer, writing for American University Radio in Washington, DC, just last month published a thoughtful essay entitled Can Hip-Hop Help Change The Meaning Of The Confederate Flag? It features an interview with a little known rapper from Alabama named Lazarus Thicklen II, who performs as Black Native, about his song and video Black Confederate.

Uploaded Dec 22, 2014, it currently has 577 views on YouTube.

She writes:

…he says his Confederate flag isn’t the same one carried into battle under Robert E. Lee.  For starters, Thicklen’s flag isn’t red, white and blue; it’s black and white. He says he wanted to retain the flag’s Southern symbolism while stripping its colors to transform its meaning.  “I wanted to have something that said, ‘Yeah, I’m Southern, but I have a progressive mindframe,’” says Thicklen, 30.

Here is the design:

Black and white rebel flag.
Black and white “Confederate flag” (Technically, what’s popularly known as the Confederate or rebel flag is the flag of the Army of Northern Virginia, or a rectangular version of the CSA battle flag, and was never a national flag of the Confederacy.)

The idea in hip hop of reclaiming and reappropriating Confederate symbolism predates Kanye West and his successors.  For example, here is a 2005 discussion entitled  Appropriation of the Confederate flag by black rap artists.  But none of these attempts, high or low profile, have managed to get significant cultural traction.  Instead, they are more like a recurrent theme within the larger musical, cultural, and political forces pushing Hip hop forward in the face of other, more major appropriation controversies (e.g., Iggy Azalea vs. Azealia Banks, Macklemore’s Grammys, etc.).

To wrap things up, let’s give Chris Rock the last word:

From The Chris Rock Show on HBO in 2012.

The Hip Hop Unity Flag

The Flags of the World database includes an entry under Hip Hop Unity flag (U.S.):

In the summer of 1996, a flag symbolizing the values of the Hip Hop Nation was officially revealed in San Francisco. The Hip Hop Unity Flag is the brain child of community activist James P Queen who is the President of Racial Unity Inc. The flag features the colors of our human family: Black, Brown, Red, Yellow and White. Unlike most flags whose stripes are laid horizontally the Hip Hop Generation-Unity Flag’s stripes stand vertical/side by side. The significance of this is to show equality… because no color is above the other. In short the flag stands for unity.

Hip hop unity flag, front (obverse). FOTW image by Antonio Martins, 14 May 1999.
Hip hop unity flag, front (obverse). FOTW image by Antonio Martins, 14 May 1999.
Hip hop unity flag, front (obverse).  FOTW image by Antonio Martins, 14 May 1999.
Hip hop unity flag, back (reverse). FOTW image by Antonio Martins, 14 May 1999.

In a posting about the flag in 1996, hip hop journalist Davey D reports on several different appearances of this flag: by SF mayor Willie Brown at a Mayors Conference; at a Peace Walkathon in 1995 as a stage backdrop; and at a summer music festival sponsored by KMEL radio, at which it was endorsed by Russell Simmons, MC Hammer, and Ice Cube.

See also:

And please help:

  • We can’t find any other information about this flag, James P Queen, or Racial Unity Inc. (other than an entry for a supposedly active non-profit in New York that was founded in 1948).  If you can, let us know at info@portlandflag.org.

X Clan: Weapon X

Brooklyn-based Afrocentric group X Clan released Return from Mecca in 2007. The music video for the single Weapon X features two flags: the green, gold, and red flag Ethiopian flag, and the red, black, and green Pan-African flag.

X Clan: Weapon X. Directed by Dale “Rage” Resteghini. Uploaded to YouTube August 24, 2006, has 320,000 plays.

Leader Brother J with the imperial Ethiopian flag in the background.  The flag, adopted by the Rastafarians, depicts the Lion of Judah.
Leader Brother J with the imperial Ethiopian flag in the background. The flag, associated with Emperor Haile Selassie and made famous by the Rastafarians, depicts the Lion of Judah.
The Lion of Judah flag.  It was the Ethiopian flag during the reign of Emporer Haile Selassie, who called himself the Lion of Judah, asserting a divine connection to the biblical tribe of Judah.
The Lion of Judah flag. It was the Ethiopian flag during the reign of Emporer Haile Selassie, who called himself the Lion of Judah, asserting a divine connection to the biblical tribe of Judah.
Waved in the background: the red, black, and green Pan-African flag.
Waved in the background: the red, black, and green Pan-African flag.
The red, black, and green flag goes by many names:  Pan-African, Afro-American, Black Liberation, Marcus Garvey, and others.  It was designed in 1920 by the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA) .
The red, black, and green flag goes by many names: Pan-African, Afro-American, Black Liberation, Marcus Garvey, and others. It was designed in 1920 by the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA) .
X Clan adopted the ankh or "Key of the Nile" as part of their symbology, using a version of the green, red, and black flag charged with this ancient symbol of universal life.  The video shows Brother J wearing a large gold ankh around his neck.
X Clan adopted the ankh or “Key of the Nile” as part of their symbology, using a version of the green, red, and black flag charged with this ancient symbol of universal life. In addition to the shoulder patch, the video shows Brother J wearing a large gold ankh around his neck.

From an earlier song Funkin’ Lesson, X Clan’s late founding member Professor X explains:

Freedom or death, we shall all be moved
Vanglorious
This is protected by the red, the black, and the green
With a key, sissy!

ankh-afam-flag

Thanks, Gontzal Royo, for pointing us to this video.

Outkast’s Stankonia flag

OutKast are a celebrated hip hop duo from Atlanta.  For their critically acclaimed 2000 album Stankonia, in what became an iconic image, they appear on the cover in front of a huge black and white variant of the US flag, with inverted stars.

Paste magazine ranked it 21st in their list, The 25 Best Album Covers of the Decade (2000-2009):

Stankonia‘s album cover presented OutKast’s Andre Benjamin and Antwan Patton as they were and are—strong, smart, funky and ready to “[give] the youth the truth from this booth.” Most striking of all is the stark, black-and-white-American-flag backdrop, hinting at a separate America—a place that exists apart from the country experienced by the masses. A place called Stankonia. Fun fact? This flag is actually enormous and hangs on the wall in the tracking room at OutKast’s northwest Atlanta recording studio. We saw it there, and it was awesome.

Cover of the album Stankonia.
Cover of the Outkast album Stankonia.  Art direction and design by Mike Rush.  Photograph by Michael Lavine.
The Stankonia flag.  Image from Wikipedia.
The Stankonia flag. Image from Wikipedia.
Outkast performing in Atlanta’s Centennial Olympic Park, September 27, 2014.  The flag design is similar but not identical to Stankonia's: the stars are right side up.
OutKast performing in Atlanta’s Centennial Olympic Park, September 27, 2014. The flag design is similar but not identical to Stankonia’s: the stars are right side up. Image from Wesley Hodges’ review in the Consequence of Sound.

See also:

Young Jeezy: Put On

This video for the Grammy-nominated hip hop song Put On by Young Jeezy popularized the monochrome, “black and silver” adaptation of the US flag.  The song was on an album entitled The Recession, and the flag was used in the video as a symbol of the Great Recession.  For most of the US, the recession started in December 2007, but for African Americans it started long before that.

Here is a censored version of the flag-filled music video:

Official video, directed by Gil Green.  Published December 19, 2009.  Currently has over 9.5 million views.

The first appearance of the flag in the video.
The first appearance of the flag in the video.
Large version used on stage.
Large version used on stage.
From one of a number of scenes of characters posing with the flag.
From one of a number of scenes of characters posing with the flag.

See also:

Machine Gun Kelly: Raise the Flag

Hip hop has a thing about flags.  This week, we’ll look at some examples.  Here is a music video by American rapper Richard Colson Baker, known as MGK (Machine Gun Kelly).  The song is Raise the Flag (uncensored).

Official video, directed by JR Saint. Published on Oct 14, 2014.  Currently has over 3.8 million views.

US flag made from printed fabric.  Image from official video.
Red, white, and blue US flag made from fabric printed with MGK’s trademark “EST 19XX”, EST = Everyone Stand Together (his crew, fans, label, movement). Image from official video.
Here is a black-and-white version of the US/EST flag, with a standard US flag attached to it.
Here is a black-and-white version of the US/EST flag, with a standard US flag attached to it.
A large black-and-white version of the US/EST flag, used as a backdrop.
A large black-and-white version of the US/EST flag, used as a backdrop.

See also: