Armenian Flags

100 years ago today the Armenian Genocide began at the hands of the Ottoman Empire.  In honor of Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day, a look at Armenian flags:

Flag of Armenia, adopted 24 August 1990.
Flag of Armenia, 1918-1922 (proportions 2:3) and 1990-present (proportions 1:2).

The Armenian tricolor was created by the government of the First Republic of Armenia, based on the colors of the late Rubenid Dynasty (red, blue, and yellow), with yellow changed to orange for aesthetic reasons.  According to the Armenian Constitution:

The red emblematizes the Armenian Highland, the Armenian people‘s continued struggle for survival, maintenance of the Christian faith, Armenia’s independence and freedom. The blue emblematizes the will of the people of Armenia to live beneath peaceful skies. The orange emblematizes the creative talent and hard-working nature of the people of Armenia.

The flag of Nagorno-Karabakh.  Adopted 2 June 1992.
The flag of Nagorno-Karabakh. Adopted 2 June 1992.

Nagorno-Karabakh is an Armenian enclave within Azerbaijan that declared itself independent in 1991. It uses the flag of Armenia with a zigzagging white stripe in the fly to represent its separation.

Flag of the Pan-Armenian Games.
Flag of the Pan-Armenian Games.

Every four years, Armenians from around the world gather in Yerevan to compete in the Pan-Armenian Games.  Alas, the flag is literally a logo — a “fire tricolor” — on a white field.

armenian-and-forgetmenot-flags
Armenian flags interspersed with forget-me-not genocide memorial flags.

To symbolize the centennial of the Armenian Genocide, the Armenian government has created a Forget-Me-Not emblem, each element of which is symbolic.  (Thanks to Patrick Genna for pointing this out.)

Some images from Flickr:

Flying the flag in Bourj Hammoud, an Armenian suburb of Beirut.  (Photo by Nicholas A. Heras, flickr.)
Flying the flag in Bourj Hammoud, an Armenian suburb of Beirut. (Photo by Nicholas A. Heras, flickr.)
An Infinity SUV in Glendale, California showing some Armenian pride.  Photo from flickr by Scott Lowe, 24 April 2012.
An Infinity SUV in Glendale, California showing some Armenian pride, 24 April 2012. (Photo by Scott Lowe, flickr)
“Fervor. This elderly Armenian American woman had as much fervor as any of the teenagers in the protest. Alternatly shouting, pounding the base of her flag on the pavment and smiling all the while. Armenian Genocide Protest, 4/24/2014.” (Photo by Aaron Guy Leroux, flickr, Los Angeles)
Flying the flag atop Mt. Ararat, 4 August 2014.  (Photo by Raffi Youredjian, flickr.)
Flying the flag atop Mt. Ararat, 4 August 2014. (Photo by Raffi Youredjian, flickr.)
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Author: SDM

Ethnography * Technology * Design

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